The state tech policy battles that will rage in 2022 – Axios

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Illustration: Megan Robinson/Axios
States will ramp up the momentum they've built in tackling key tech policy priorities through 2022, speeding ahead of any potential federal legislation.
Why it matters: As Congress continues to make little tangible progress passing new rules for the tech industry, state legislatures have taken the lead in enacting new tech regulations.
What to watch: These are the tech policy fights that will play out in the states next year, according to industry watchers.
1. Privacy: Industry groups have pressed Congress to enact a comprehensive privacy law to avoid a patchwork of state regulation, but states continue to move forward while federal lawmakers tread water.
2. App store regulations: Arizona advanced a bill that would let developers in the state avoid the typical 30% fees that Apple and Google charge developers, but it ultimately failed after intense industry lobbying.
3. Speech and content moderation: Lawmakers in Florida and Texas, raising complaints that conservatives had been censored, both passed laws aimed at limiting social media companies' content moderation practices — but those laws were blocked by the courts.
4. Digital taxes: Maryland in 2021 became the first state to pass a law taxing revenue that large tech companies generate from showing online ads to state residents.
5. Cybersecurity risks: Maryland and Minnesota considered bills in 2021 that would study cybersecurity risks, and New York considered a data breach notification bill. In total, 21 states considered cybersecurity-related legislation in 2021.
Meanwhile, tech trade groups are following the action, beefing up their lobbying operations in the states.
The bottom line: "There is not the internet of Texas. There is not the internet of Maine. There is the internet. And a lot of these issues should be dealt with at the federal level," Edmonson said.
Illustration: Shoshana Gordon/Axios
A coalition of New York businesses, along with Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.), is making its case that the Empire State should be a prime beneficiary of federal funding for the domestic semiconductor industry.
State of play: Congress's push to pass funding for the U.S. chip industry remains stalled, but regions of the country are already trying to make their case for a share of the money.
Photo: David McNew/Getty Images
The Federal Aviation Administration said Thursday it had approved nearly 80% of the U.S. commercial fleet to perform low-visibility landings at airports with new 5G services after fears of signal interference limited 5G rollout.
Why it matters: The FAA approvals will help provide more certainty after the agency raised fears that 5G signals could reduce the accuracy of certain equipment, known as radio altimeters, that helps planes land and take off in inclement weather.
Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios
Peloton stock fell by as much as 25% on Thursday, following a CNBC report that the connected fitness company will temporarily halt production on its bikes and treadmills.
Why it matters: Peloton is viewed by many as a proxy for consumer behavior in the pandemic era, as its popularity surged when gyms closed and people wanted to exercise at home.
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